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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to explore the impact of facilitative mental imagery training on distance runners. Female (n=20) and male (n=11) athletes, separated by skill level classifications: Collegiate (n=19) and recreational (n=12) completed the Motivational Imagery Ability Measure for Sport (MIAMS) before and after mental imagery training. Included in the training were relaxation and breathing techniques followed by guided imagery related to distance running training and competition. Multiple t-tests examining the effects of the imagery training on MIAMS survey responses between collegiate and recreational athletes for motivational general-mastery imagery (MG-M) and arousal imagery (MG-A) were employed. Significance was found in the emotional response evoked and the ease of producing imagery between the two groups. More research must be done to better understand the effects of mental imagery training on distance athletes.